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    Eyelid twitch

    Eyelid spasm; Eye twitch; Twitch - eyelid; Blepharospasm

    An eyelid twitch is a general term for involuntary spasms of the eyelid muscles. Sometimes, the eyelid may repeatedly close (or nearly close) and reopen. This article discusses eyelid twitches in general.

    Causes

    The most common things that make the muscle in your eyelid twitch are fatigue, stress, and caffeine. Once spasms begin, they may continue off and on for a few days. Then, they disappear. Most people experience this type of eyelid twitch on occasion and find it very annoying. In most cases, you won't even notice when the twitch has stopped.

    More severe contractions, where the eyelid completely closes, are possible. These can be caused by irritation of the surface of the eye (cornea) or the membranes lining the eyelids (conjunctiva).

    Sometimes, the reason your eyelid is twitching cannot be identified. This form of eyelid twitching lasts much longer, is often very uncomfortable, and can also cause your eyelids to close completely.

    Symptoms

    • Repeated,uncontrollable twitching or spasms of your eyelid (usually the upper lid)
    • Very sensitive to light
    • Blurry vision (sometimes)

    Treatment

    Eyelid twitching usually disappears without treatment. In the meantime, the following steps may help:

    • Get more sleep.
    • Drink less caffeine.
    • Lubricate your eyes with eye drops.

    If twitching is severe, small injections of botulinum toxin can temporarily cure the spasms.

    Outlook (Prognosis)

    The outlook depends on the specific type or cause of eyelid twitch. In some cases, the twitches usually stop within a week.

    Possible Complications

    Permanent eye injury from unrecognized cornea injury is possible, but rare.

    When to Contact a Medical Professional

    Call your primary care doctor or eye doctor (ophthalmologist, optometrist) if:

    • Eyelid twitching does not go away within 1 week
    • Twitching completely closes your eyelid
    • Twitching involves other parts of your face
    • You have redness, swelling, or a discharge from your eye
    • Your upper eyelid is drooping

    References

    Faucett DC. Essential blepharospasm. In: Yanoff M, Duker JS, eds. Ophthalmology. 3rd ed. St. Louis, Mo: Mosby Elsevier; 2008:chap 12.8.

    Yanoff M, Cameron D. Diseases of the visual system. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Cecil Medicine. 24th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: SaundersElsevier; 2011:chap 431.

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      A Closer Look

        Tests for Eyelid twitch

          Review Date: 8/14/2012

          Reviewed By: Linda J. Vorvick, MD, Medical Director and Director of Didactic Curriculum, MEDEX Northwest Division of Physician Assistant Studies, Department of Family Medicine, UW Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Washington. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M. Health Solutions, Ebix, Inc.

          The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
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