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    Phenylketonuria

    PKU; Neonatal phenylketonuria

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is a rare condition in which a baby is born without the ability to properly break down an amino acid called phenylalanine.

    Causes

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is inherited, which means it is passed down through families. Both parents must pass on the defective gene in order for a baby to have the condition. This is called an autosomal recessive trait.

    Babies with PKU are missing an enzyme called phenylalanine hydroxylase, which is needed to break down an essential amino acid called phenylalanine. The substance is found in foods that contain protein.

    Without the enzyme, levels of phenylalanine and two closely-related substances build up in the body. These substances are harmful to the central nervous system and cause brain damage.

    Symptoms

    Phenylalanine plays a role in the body's production of melanin, the pigment responsible for skin and hair color. Therefore, infants with the condition often have lighter skin, hair, and eyes than brothers or sisters without the disease.

    Other symptoms may include:

    • Delayed mental and social skills
    • Head size significantly below normal
    • Hyperactivity
    • Jerking movements of the arms or legs
    • Intellectual disability
    • Seizures
    • Skin rashes
    • Tremors
    • Unusual positioning of hands

    If the condition is untreated or foods containing phenylalanine are not avoided, a "mousy" or "musty" odor may be detected on the breath and skin and in urine. The unusual odor is due to a buildup of phenylalanine substances in the body.

    PKU can be easily detected with a simple blood test. All states in the US require a PKU screening test for all newborns as part of the newborn screening panel. The test is generally done by taking a few drops of blood from the baby before the baby leaves the hospital.

    If the initial screening test is positive, further blood and urine tests are required to confirm the diagnosis.

    Treatment

    PKU is a treatable disease. Treatment involves a diet that is extremely low in phenylalanine, particularly when the child is growing. The diet must be strictly followed. This requires close supervision by a registered dietitian or doctor, and cooperation of the parent and child. Those who continue the diet into adulthood have better physical and mental health. “Diet for life” has become the standard recommended by most experts. This is especially important before conception and throughout pregnancy.

    Phenylalanine occurs in significant amounts in milk, eggs, and other common foods. The artificial sweetener NutraSweet (aspartame) also contains phenylalanine. Any products containing aspartame should be avoided.

    A special infant formula called Lofenalac is made for infants with PKU. It can be used throughout life as a protein source that is extremely low in phenylalanine and balanced for the remaining essential amino acids.

    Taking supplements such as fish oil to replace the long chain fatty acids missing from a standard phenylalanine-free diet may help improve neurologic development, including fine motor coordination. Other specific supplements, such as iron or carnitine, may be needed.

    Outlook (Prognosis)

    The outcome is expected to be very good if the diet is closely followed, starting shortly after the child's birth. If treatment is delayed or the condition remains untreated, brain damage will occur. School functioning may be mildly impaired.

    If proteins containing phenylalanine are not avoided, PKU can lead to intellectual disability by the end of the first year of life.

    Severe intellectual disability occurs if the disorder is untreated. ADHD (attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder) appears to be a common problem seen in those who do not stick to a very low-phenylalanine diet.

    When to Contact a Medical Professional

    Call your health care provider if your infant has not been tested for PKU. This is particularly important if anyone in your family has the disorder.

    Prevention

    An enzyme assay can determine if parents carry the gene for PKU. Chorionic villus sampling can be done during pregnancy to screen the unborn baby for PKU.

    It is very important that women with PKU closely follow a strict low-phenylalanine diet both before becoming pregnant and throughout the pregnancy, since build-up of this substance will damage the developing baby even if the child has not inherited the defective gene.

    References

    American Dietetic Association. Providing nutrition services for infants, children, and adults with developmental disabilities and special health care needs. J Am Diet Assoc. Jan 2004; 104(1): 97-107.

    Beblo S. Effect of fish oil supplementation on fatty acid status, coordination, and fine motor skills in children with phenylketonuria. J Pediatr. May 2007; 150(5): 479-84.

    Filiano JJ. Neurometabolic diseases in the newborn. Clin Perinatol. Jun 2006; 33(2): 411-79.

    Gassio R. School performance in early and continuously treated phenylketonuria. Pediatr Neurol. Oct 2005; 33(4): 267-71.

    Welch T. Dietary management of mothers with PKU during pregnancy. J Pediatr. Feb 2004; 144(2); 1A.

    Welch TR. Pharmacologic approach to PKU? J Pediatr. Jun 2007; 150(6); A3.

    Screening for phenylketonuria (PKU): US Preventive Services Task Force reaffirmation recommendation. Ann Fam Med. 2008;6:166.

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    • Phenylketonuria test

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    • Phenylketonuria test

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      • Phenylketonuria test

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      • Phenylketonuria test

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      Tests for Phenylketonuria

        Review Date: 6/9/2013

        Reviewed By: Sameer Patel, MD, Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by A.D.A.M. Health Solutions, Ebix, Inc., Editorial Team: David Zieve, MD, MHA, Bethanne Black, Stephanie Slon, and Nissi Wang.

        The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
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