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    Hypochondria

    Hypochondriasis

    Hypochondria is a belief that physical symptoms are signs of a serious illness, even when there is no medical evidence to support the presence of an illness.

    Causes

    People with hypochondria are overly focused on their physical health. They have an unrealistic fear of having a serious disease. This disorder occurs equally in men and women.

    The way people with hypochondria think about their physical symptoms can make them more likely to have this condition. As they focus on and worry about physical sensations, a cycle of symptoms and worry begins, which can be difficult to stop.

    It is important to realize that people with hypochondria do not purposely create these symptoms (malingering). They are unable to control the symptoms.

    People who have a history of physical or sexual abuse are more likely to have this disorder. However, this does not mean that every person with a hypochondria disorder has a history of abuse.

    Symptoms

    People with hypochondria are unable to control their fears and worries. They often believe any symptom or sensation is a sign of a serious illness.

    They seek out reassurance from family, friends, or health care providers on a regular basis. They feel better for a short time at most, and then begin to worry about the same symptoms, or about new symptoms.

    Symptoms may shift and change, and are often vague. People with hypochondria often examine their own body.

    Those who are affected may recognize that their fear of having a serious disease is unreasonable or unfounded.

    Exams and Tests

    Treatment

    It is important to have a supportive relationship with a health care provider. You should have only one primary care provider to avoid having too many tests and procedures.

    The health care provider should tell you that you do not have a disease, but that continued medical follow-up will help control the symptoms. People with hypochondria feel real distress, so their symptoms should not be denied or challenged.

    Antidepressants such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) can help reduce the worry and physical symptoms of this disorder.

    Finding a mental health provider who has experience treating this disorder with talk therapy (psychotherapy) can be helpful. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), a kind of talk therapy, can help you deal with your pain. During therapy, you will learn:

    • To recognize what seems to make the symptoms worse
    • To develop methods of coping with the symptoms
    • To keep yourself more active, even if you still have symptoms

    Outlook (Prognosis)

    The disorder is usually long-term (chronic), unless psychological factors or mood and anxiety disorders are treated.

    Possible Complications

    • Complications from invasive testing to look for the cause of symptoms
    • Dependence on pain relievers or sedatives
    • Depression and anxiety or panic disorder
    • Lost time from work due to frequent appointments with health care providers

    When to Contact a Medical Professional

    Call your health care provider if you or your child has symptoms of hypochondria.

    References

    Greenberg DB, Braun IM, Cassem NH. Functional somatic symptoms and somatoform disorders. In: Stern TA, Rosenbaum JF, Fava M, Biederman J, Rauch SL, eds. Massachusetts General Hospital Comprehensive Clinical Psychiatry. 1st ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Mosby Elsevier; 2008: chap 24.

    Feinstein RE, deGruy FV. Difficult patients: personality disorders and somatoform complaints. In: Rakel RE, ed. Textbook of Family Medicine. 8th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier; 2011:chap 46.

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          Review Date: 9/19/2012

          Reviewed By: Linda J. Vorvick, MD, Medical Director and Director of Didactic Curriculum, MEDEX Northwest Division of Physician Assistant Studies, Department of Family Medicine, UW Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Washington. Timothy Rogge, MD, Medical Director, Family Medical Psychiatry Center, Kirkland,WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M. Health Solutions, Ebix, Inc.

          The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
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