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    Ingrown toenail

    Onychocryptosis; Unguis incarnatus; Nail avlusion; Matrix excision

    An ingrown toenail occurs when the edge of the nail grows down and into the skin of the toe.

    Causes

    An ingrown toenail can result from a number of things. Poorly fitting shoes and toenails that are not properly trimmed are the most common causes. The skin along the edge of a toenail may become red and infected. The great toe is affected most often, but any toenail can become ingrown.

    Ingrown toenails may occur when extra pressure is placed on your toe. This pressure is caused by shoes that are too tight or too loose. If you walk often or participate in athletics, a shoe that is even a little tight can cause this problem. Deformities of the foot or toes can also place extra pressure on the toe.

    Nails that are not trimmed properly can also cause ingrown toenails.

    • Toenails that are trimmed too short, or if the edges are rounded rather than cut straight across may causethe nail tocurl downward and grow into the skin.
    • Poor eyesight, inability to reach the toes easily, or having thick nails can make it hard to properly trim nails.
    • Picking or tearing at the corners of the nails can also cause an ingrown toenail.

    Some people are born with nails that are curved and grow downward. Others have toenails that are too large for their toes. Stubbing your toe or other injuries can also lead to an ingrown toenail.

    Symptoms

    There may be pain, redness and swelling around the nail.

    Exams and Tests

    An exam of the foot will show the following:

    • Skin along the edge of the nail appears to be growing over the nail, or the nail seems to be growing underneath the skin.
    • Skin is swollen, firm, red, or tender to touch. There may be a small amount of pus.

    Tests or x-rays are usually not needed.

    Treatment

    If you have diabetes, nerve damage in the leg or foot, poor blood circulation to your foot, or an infection around the nail, go to the doctor right away. Donot try to treatan ingrown nailat home.

    Otherwise, to treat an ingrown nail at home:

    • Soak the foot in warm water 3 to 4 times a day if possible. After soaking, keep the toe dry.
    • Gently massage over the inflamed skin.
    • Place a small piece of cotton or dental floss under the nail. Wet the cotton with water or antiseptic.

    When trimming your toenails:

    • Briefly soak your foot in warm water to soften the nail.
    • Use a clean, sharp trimmer.
    • Trim toenails straight across the top. Do not taper or round the corners or trim too short. Do not try to cut out the ingrown portion of the nail yourself. This will only make the problem worse.

    Consider wearing sandals until the problemgoes away. Over-the-counter medication that is applied to the ingrown toenail may help with the pain, but itdoes not treat the problem.

    If this does not work and the ingrown nail gets worse, see your family doctor, a foot specialist (podiatrist) or a skin specialist (dermatologist).

    If your ingrown nail does not heal or keeps coming back, your doctor may remove part of the nail:

    • Numbing medicine is first injected into the toe.
    • The doctor usesscissors to cut along the edge of the nail where the skin is growing over. This portion of the nail is removed. This procedure is called a partial nail avulsion.
    • It takes 2 to 4 months for the nail to regrow.

    Sometimes your doctor will use a chemical, electrical current, or another small surgical cut to destroy or remove the area from which a new nail may grow.

    If the toe is infected, your doctor may prescribe antibiotics.

    Outlook (Prognosis)

    Treatmentusually controls the infection and relieves pain. The condition is likely to return ifyou do not practice good foot care.

    This condition may become serious in people with diabetes, poor circulation, and nerve problems (peripheral neuropathies).

    Possible Complications

    In severe cases, the infectioncan spread through the toe and into the bone.

    When to Contact a Medical Professional

    Call your health care provider if you:

    • Are unable to trim an ingrown toenail
    • Have severe pain, redness, swelling, or fever

    If you have diabetes, nerve damage in the leg or foot, poor blood circulation to your foot, or an infection around the nail, your risk for complications is higher. If you have diabetes, see your health care provider.

    Prevention

    Wear shoes that fit properly. Shoes that you wear every day should have plenty of room around your toes. Shoes that you wear for walking briskly or for running should also have plenty of room, but not be too loose.

    When trimming your toenails:

    • Briefly soak your foot in warm water to soften the nail.
    • Use a clean, sharp nail trimmer.
    • Trim toenails straight across the top. Do not taper or round the corners or trim too short.
    • Do not pick or tear at the nails.

    Keepyour feet clean and dry. People with diabetes should have routine foot exams and nail care.

    References

    Heidelbaugh JJ, Lee H. Management of the ingrown toenail. Am Fam Physician. 2009;79(4):303-8.

    Ishikawa SN. Disorders of nails and skin. In: Canale ST, Beaty JH, eds. Campbell’s Operative Orthopaedics. Philadelphia, Pa.: Elsevier Mosby; 2012:chap 87.

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    • Ingrown toenail

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      • Ingrown toenail

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      A Closer Look

        Tests for Ingrown toenail

          Review Date: 4/16/2013

          Reviewed By: C. Benjamin Ma, MD, Assistant Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Bethanne Black, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

          The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
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          St. Luke's Hospital - 232 South Woods Mill Road - Chesterfield, MO 63017 Main Number: 314-434-1500 Emergency Dept: 314-205-6990 Patient Billing: 888-924-9200
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