Chediak-Higashi syndrome
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Chediak-Higashi syndrome

Definition

Chediak-Higashi syndrome is a rare disease of the immune and nervous systems that involves pale-colored hair, eyes, and skin.

Causes

Chediak-Higashi syndrome is passed down through families (inherited). It is an autosomal recessive disease. This means that both parents must pass the faulty gene to the child to show symptoms of the disease.

Defects have been found in the CHS1 (also called LYST) gene. The primary defect in this disease is found in certain substances normally present in skin cells and certain white blood cells.

Symptoms

Children with this condition may have:

  • Silver hair, light-colored eyes (albinism)
  • Increased infections in the lungs, skin, and mucous membranes
  • Jerky eye movements (nystagmus)

Infection of affected children with certain viruses, such as Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), can cause a deadly illness resembling the blood cancer lymphoma.

Other symptoms may include:

  • Decreased vision
  • Intellectual disability
  • Muscle weakness
  • Nerve problems in the limbs (peripheral neuropathy)
  • Nosebleeds or easy bruising
  • Numbness
  • Tremor
  • Seizures
  • Sensitivity to bright light (photophobia)
  • Unsteady walking (ataxia)

Exams and Tests

The doctor will perform a physical exam. This may show signs of a swollen spleen or liver or jaundice.

Tests that may be done include:

  • Complete blood count, including white blood cell count
  • Blood platelet count
  • Blood culture and smear
  • Brain MRI or CT
  • EEG
  • EMG
  • Nerve conduction tests

Treatment

There is no specific treatment for Chediak-Higashi syndrome. Bone marrow transplants appear to have been successful in several patients, especially when performed early in the disease.

Antibiotics are used to treat infections. Antiviral drugs such as acyclovir and chemotherapy drugs are often used in the accelerated phase of the disease. Surgery may be needed to drain abscesses in some cases.

Support Groups

Chediak-Higashi Syndrome Association -- www.chediak-higashi.org

Outlook (Prognosis)

Death often occurs in the first 10 years of life, from chronic infections or accelerated disease that results in lymphoma-like illness. However, some affected children have survived longer.

Possible Complications

  • Frequent infections especially with Epstein-Barr virus
  • Lymphoma-like cancer
  • Early death

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Call your health care provider if you have a family history of this disorder and you are planning to have children.

Call for an appointment with your health care provider if your child shows symptoms of Chediak-Higashi syndrome.

Prevention

Genetic counseling is recommended before becoming pregnant if you have a family history of Chediak-Higashi.

References

Boxer LA. Disorders of Phagocyte Function. In: Kliegman RM, Behrman RE, Jenson HB, Stanton BF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. 18th Ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Saunders Elsevier; 2007: chap 129.


Review Date: 8/4/2011
Reviewed By: Chad Haldeman-Englert, MD, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Section on Medical Genetics, Winston-Salem, NC. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc.
The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
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