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    Asherman syndrome

    Uterine synechiae

    Asherman syndrome is the formation of intrauterine adhesions (scar tissue), which typically develop after uterine surgery.

    Causes

    Asherman syndrome is a rare condition. In most cases, it occurs in women who have had several dilatation and curettage (D&C) procedures.

    A severe pelvic infection unrelated to surgery may also lead to Asherman syndrome.

    Intrauterine adhesions can also form after infection with tuberculosis or schistosomiasis. These infections are rare in the United States, and uterine complications such as Asherman syndrome related to these infections are even less common.

    Symptoms

    The adhesions may cause amenorrhea (lack of menstrual periods), repeated miscarriages, and infertility.

    However, such symptoms could be related to several conditions. They are more likely to indicate Asherman syndrome if they occur suddenly after a D&C or other uterine surgery.

    Exams and Tests

    A pelvic exam is usually normal.

    Tests may include:

    • Blood tests to detect tuberculosis or schistosomiasis
    • Hysteroscopy
    • Hysterosonogram
    • Infertility evaluation
    • Transvaginal ultrasound examination

    Treatment

    Treatment involves surgery to cut and remove the adhesions or scar tissue. This can usually be done with hysteroscopy, which uses small instruments and a camera placed into the uterus through the cervix.

    After scar tissue is removed, the uterine cavity must be kept open while it heals to prevent adhesions from returning. Your health care provider may place a small balloon inside the uterus for several days and prescribe estrogen therapy while the uterine lining heals.

    Antibiotic treatment may be necessary if there is an infection.

    Support Groups

    The stress of illness can often be helped by joining a support group where members share common experiences and problems.

    Outlook (Prognosis)

    Asherman syndrome can be cured in most women with surgery, although sometimes more than one procedure will be necessary.

    Women who are infertile because of Asherman syndrome may have a successful pregnancy after treatment. Successful pregnancy depends on the severity of Asherman syndrome and the difficulty of the treatment, as well as other factors that affect fertility and pregnancy.

    Possible Complications

    Complications of hysteroscopic surgery are uncommon and include bleeding, perforation of the uterus, and pelvic infection.

    In some cases, treatment of Asherman syndrome will not cure infertility.

    When to Contact a Medical Professional

    Call your doctor or nurse if your menstrual periods do not return after a gynecologic or obstetrical procedure. See a specialist for an infertility evaluation if you cannot get pregnant after 6 to 12 months of trying.

    Prevention

    Most cases of Asherman syndrome cannot be predicted or prevented.

    References

    Simpson JL, Jauniaux ERM. Pregnancy loss. In: Gabbe SG, Niebyl JR, Simpson JL, eds. Obstetrics: Normal and Problem Pregnancies. 5th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Elsevier Churchill Livingstone; 2007:chap 24.

    Katz VL. Benign Gynecologic Lesions: Vulva, Vagina, Cervix, Uterus, Oviduct, Ovary, Ultrasound Imaging of
    Pelvic Structures. In: Katz VL, Lentz GM, Lobo RA, Gershenson DM, eds.Comprehensive Gynecology. 6th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Mosby Elsevier; 2012:chap 18.

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    • Uterus

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    • Normal uterine anatomy (...

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      • Uterus

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      • Normal uterine anatomy (...

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      A Closer Look

        Self Care

          Tests for Asherman syndrome

            Review Date: 7/23/2012

            Reviewed By: Melanie N. Smith, MD, PhD, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M. Health Solutions, Ebix, Inc.

            The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
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