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    Radionuclide cystogram

    Bladder scan

    A radionuclide cystogram is a special imaging test called a nuclear scanthat checks how well your bladder and urinary tract work.

    How the Test is Performed

    The specific procedure may vary slightly depending on the reason for the examination.

    You will lie on scanner table. After cleaning the urinary opening, the health care provider will place a thin flexible tube, called a catheter, through the urethra and into the bladder. A liquid containing radioactive materialflows into the bladder until the bladder is full or you say that your bladder feels full.

    Thescanner detects radioactivity to check your bladder and urinary tract. When the scan is done depends onthe suspected problem. You may be asked to urinate into a urinal, bedpan, or towels while being scanned.

    To test for incomplete bladder emptying, images may be taken with the bladder full. Then you will be allowed to get up and urinate into the toilet and return to the scanner. Images are taken immediately after emptying the bladder.

    How to Prepare for the Test

    There is no special preparation needed. You will need to sign a consent form. You will be asked to wear a hospital gown. Remove jewelry and metal objects before the scan.

    How the Test Will Feel

    You may feel some discomfort when the catheter is inserted. Catheterization and urination in public -- sometimes, when lying on the table -- may be difficult or embarrassing. You cannot feel the radioisotope or the scanning.

    After the scan, you may feel slight discomfort for 1 or 2 days when you urinate. The urine may be slightly pink. If you have persistent discomfort, a fever, or bright red urine, contact your health care provider.

    Why the Test is Performed

    This test is done to see how your bladder empties and fills. It can be used to check for urine reflux or an obstruction in urine flow. It is usually done to evaluate patients with urinary tract infections, particularly children.

    Normal Results

    A normal value is no reflux or other abnormal urine flow, and no obstruction to the flow of urine occurs. The bladder empties completely.

    What Abnormal Results Mean

    Abnormal results may be due to:

    • Abnormal bladder response to pressure -- could be due to a nerve problem or other disorder
    • Back flow of urine (vesicoureteric reflux)
    • Blockage of the urethra urethral obstruction -- most commonly due to an enlarged prostate gland

    Risks

    Risks are the same as for x-rays (radiation) and catheterization of the bladder.

    There is a small amount of radiation exposure with any nuclear scan (it comes from the radioisotope, not the scanner). The exposure is less than with standard x-rays. The radiation is very mild, and virtually all radiation is gone in a short time. However, any radiation exposure is discouraged for women who are or might be pregnant.

    Risks for catheterization include urinary tract infection and (rarely) damage to the urethra, bladder, or other nearby structures.

    References

    Bauer R, Kogan BA. New Developments in the Diagnosis and Management of Pediatric UTIs. Urol Clin North Am. 2008;35:47-58.

    Fulgham PF, Bishoff JT. Urinary tract imaging: Basic principles. In: Wein AJ, ed. Campbell-Walsh Urology. 10th ed. Philadelphia, Pa:Saunders Elsevier; 2011:chap 4.

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    • Cystography

      illustration

      • Cystography

        illustration

      Tests for Radionuclide cystogram

      Review Date: 10/9/2012

      Reviewed By: David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M. Health Solutions, Ebix, Inc. Louis S. Liou, MD, PhD, Chief of Urology, Cambridge Health Alliance, Visiting Assistant Professor of Surgery, Harvard Medical School.

      The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
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