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    Lung cancer - small cell

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a fast-growing type of lung cancer. It spreads much more quickly than non-small cell lung cancer.

    There are two types of SCLC:

    • Small cell carcinoma (oat cell cancer)
    • Combined small cell carcinoma

    Most SCLCs are of the oat cell type.

    Causes

    About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women.

    Almost all cases of SCLC are due to cigarette smoking. SCLC is rare in people who have never smoked.

    SCLC is the most aggressive form of lung cancer. It usually starts in the breathing tubes (bronchi) in the center of the chest. Although the cancer cells are small, they grow very quickly and create large tumors. These tumors often spread rapidly (metastasize) to other parts of the body, including the brain, liver, and bone.

    Symptoms

    Symptoms of SCLC include:

    • Bloody sputum (phlegm)
    • Chest pain
    • Cough
    • Loss of appetite
    • Shortness of breath
    • Weight loss
    • Wheezing

    Other symptoms that may occur with this disease, especially in the late stages, include:

    • Facial swelling
    • Fever
    • Hoarseness or changing voice
    • Swallowing difficulty
    • Weakness

    Exams and Tests

    The doctor will perform a physical exam and ask about your medical history. You will be asked whether you smoke, and if so, how much and for how long.

    When listening to your chest with a stethoscope,the doctor mayhear fluid around the lungs or areas where the lung has partially collapsed. Each of these findingsmay suggest cancer.

    SCLC has usually spread to other parts of your body by the time it is diagnosed.

    Tests that may be performed include:

    • Bone scan
    • Chest x-ray
    • Complete blood count (CBC)
    • CT scan
    • Liver function tests
    • MRI
    • Positron emission tomography (PET) scan
    • Sputum test (cytology, looking for cancer cells)
    • Thoracentesis (removal of fluid from the chest cavity around the lungs)

    In most cases, a piece of tissue is removed from your lungs or other areas to be examined under a microscope. This is called a biopsy. There are several ways to do a biopsy:

    • Bronchoscopy combined with biopsy
    • CT scan-directed needle biopsy
    • Endoscopic esophageal ultrasound (EUS) with biopsy
    • Mediastinoscopy with biopsy
    • Open lung biopsy
    • Pleural biopsy
    • Video-assisted thoracoscopy

    Usually if a biopsy shows cancer, more imaging tests are done to find out the stage of the cancer. Stage means how big the tumor is and how far it has spread. SCLC is classified as either:

    • Limited: cancer is only in the chest and can be treated with radiation therapy
    • Extensive: cancer has spread outside the chest

    Treatment

    Because SCLC spreads quickly throughout the body, treatment must include cancer-killing drugs (chemotherapy) taken by mouth or injected into the body.

    Treatment with bothchemotherapy and radiation isdone forpeople with SCLC that has spread throughout the body.In this case,the treatment only helps relieve symptoms. It does not cure the disease.

    Radiation therapy can be used with chemotherapy if surgery is not possible. Radiation therapy uses powerful x-rays or other forms of radiation to kill cancer cells.

    Radiation may be used to:

    • Treat the cancer, along with chemotherapy, if surgery is not possible
    • Help relieve symptoms caused by the cancer, such as breathing problems and swelling
    • Help relieve cancer pain when the cancer has spread to the bones

    Often, SCLC may have already spread to the brain. This can occureven when there are no symptoms or other signs of cancer in the brain. As a result, some patients with smaller cancers, or who had a good response in their first round of chemotherapy may receive radiation therapy to the brain. This method is called prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI).

    Surgery helps very few patients with SCLC because the disease has often spread by the time it is diagnosed. Surgery may be done when there is only one tumor that has not spread. If surgery is done, chemotherapy or radiation therapy is still needed.

    Support Groups

    You can ease the stress of illness by joining a cancer support group. Sharing with others who have common experiences and problems can help you not feel alone.

    Outlook (Prognosis)

    How well you do depends on how much the lung cancer has spread.SCLC is very deadly. Not many people with this type of cancer are still alive 5 years after diagnosis.

    Treatment can often prolong life for 6to 12 months, even when the cancer has spread.

    When to Contact a Medical Professional

    Call your health care provider if you have symptoms of lung cancer, particularly if you smoke.

    Prevention

    If you smoke, now is the time to quit. Also try to avoid secondhand smoke.

    References

    Johnson DH, Blot WJ, Carbone DP, et al. Cancer of the lung: non-small cell lung cancer and small cell lung cancer. In: Abeloff MD, Armitage JO, Niederhuber JE, et al., eds. Abeloff’s Clinical Oncology. 4th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Elsevier Churchill Livingstone; 2008:chap 76.

    National Cancer Institute: PDQ Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment. Bethesda, Md: National Cancer Institute. Date last modified 06/25/2013. Available at: http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/pdq/treatment/small-cell-lung/healthprofessional. Accessed September 23, 2013.

    National Comprehensive Cancer Network. NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology: Small cell lung cancer. Version 2.2014. Available at: http://www.nccn.org/professionals/physician_gls/pdf/sclc.pdf. Accessed September 23, 2013.

    Neal JW, Gubens MA, Wakelee HA. Current management of small cell lung cancer. Clin Chest Med. 2011;32:853-863.

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    • Bronchoscope

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      • Bronchoscopy

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      • Lungs

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      • Lung cancer, lateral che...

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      • Lung cancer, frontal che...

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      • Adenocarcinoma - chest X...

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      • Bronchial cancer - CT sc...

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      • Bronchial cancer - chest...

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      • Lung with squamous cell ...

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      • Lung cancer - chemothera...

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      • Adenocarcinoma

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      • Large cell carcinoma

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      • Small cell carcinoma

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      • Squamous cell carcinoma

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      • Secondhand smoke and lun...

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      • Normal lungs and alveoli

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      • Respiratory system

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      • Smoking hazards

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      • Bronchoscope

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      A Closer Look

      Self Care

        Tests for Lung cancer - small cell

        Review Date: 9/20/2013

        Reviewed By: Todd Gersten, MD, Hematology/Oncology, Florida Cancer Specialists & Research Institute, Wellington, FL. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Bethanne Black, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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