St. Luke's Hospital
Main Number: 314-434-1500 Emergency Dept: 314-205-6990 Patient Billing: 888-924-9200
Find a Physician Payment Options Locations & Directions
Follow us on: facebook twitter Mobile Email Page Email Page Print Page Print Page Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size Font Size
America's 50 Best Hospitals
Meet the Doctor
Spirit of Women
Community Health Needs Assessment
Home > Health Information

Multimedia Encyclopedia

    Print-Friendly
    Bookmarks

    Eye and orbit ultrasound

    Echography - eye orbit; Ultrasound - eye orbit; Ocular ultrasonography; Orbital ultrasonography

    An eye and orbit ultrasound is a test to look at the eye area, and to measure the size and structures of the eye.

    How the Test is Performed

    The test is usually done in the ophthalmologist's office or the ophthalmology department of a hospital or clinic.

    Your eye is numbed with medicine (anesthetic drops). The ultrasound wand (transducer) is placed against the front surface of the eye.

    The ultrasound uses high-frequency sound waves that travel through the eye. Reflections (echoes) of the sound waves form a picture of the structure of the eye. The test takes about 15 minutes.

    There are two types of scans: A-scan and B-scan.

    For the A-scan:

    • You will usually sit in a chair and place your chin on a chin rest. You will look straight ahead.
    • A small probe is placed against the front of your eye.
    • The test may also be done with you lying back. With this method, a fluid-filled cup is placed against your eye to do the test.

    For the B-scan:

    • You will be seated and you may be asked to look in many directions. The test is usually done with your eyes closed.
    • A gel is placed on the skin of your eyelids. The B-scan probe is gently placed against your eyelids to do the test.

    How to Prepare for the Test

    No special preparation is needed for this test.

    How the Test Will Feel

    Your eye is numbed, so you should nothave any discomfort. You may be asked to look in different directions to improve the ultrasound image or so it can view different areas of your eye.

    The gel used with the B-scan may rundown your cheek, but you will notfeel any discomfort or pain.

    Why the Test is Performed

    Your doctor may order this test if you have cataracts or other eye problems.

    An A-scan ultrasound measures the eye to determine the right power of a lens implant before cataract surgery.

    A B-scan is done to look at the inside part of the eye or the space behind the eye that cannot be seen directly. This may occur when you have cataracts or other conditions that make it hard for the doctor to see into the back of your eye. The test may help diagnose retinal detachment, tumors, or other disorders.

    Normal Results

    For an A-scan, measurements of the eye are in the normal range.

    For a B-scan, the structures of the eye and orbit appear normal.

    What Abnormal Results Mean

    A B-scan may show:

    • Bleeding into the clear gel (vitreous) that fills the back of the eye (vitreous hemorrhage)
    • Cancer of the retina (retinoblastoma), under the retina, or in other parts of the eye (such as melanoma)
    • Damaged tissue or injuries in the bony socket (orbit) that surrounds and protects the eye
    • Foreign bodies
    • Pulling away of the retina from the back of the eye (retinal detachment)
    • Swelling (inflammation)

    Risks

    To avoid scratching the cornea, do not rub the numbed eye until the anesthetic wears off (about 15 minutes). There are no other risks.

    References

    Coleman DJ, Silverman RH, Rondeau MJ, et al. Evaluation of the posterior chamber, vitreous and retina with ultrasound. In: Tasman W, Jaeger EA, eds. Duane's Ophthalmology. 2013 ed. Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2009:vol 3, chap 3.

    Fisher YL, Klancnik Jr JM, Rodriguez-Coleman H, et al. Contact B-scan ultrasonography. In: Yanoff M, Duker JS, eds. Yanoff & Duker: Ophthalmology. 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2008:chap 6.7.

    Fisher YL, Nogueira F, Salles D. Diagnostic ophthalmic ultrasonography. In: Tasman W, Jaeger EA, eds. Duane's Ophthalmology.2013 ed. Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2012:vol 2, chap 108.

    Massoud TF, Cross JJ. The orbit. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Grainger RG, Allison DJ, eds. Grainger & Allison's Diagnostic Radiology. 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Churchill-Livingstone; 2008:chap 61.

    BACK TO TOP

    • Head and eye Echoencepha...

      illustration

      • Head and eye Echoencepha...

        illustration

      A Closer Look

        Talking to your MD

          Self Care

            Tests for Eye and orbit ultrasound

            Review Date: 2/7/2013

            Reviewed By: Franklin W. Lusby, MD, Ophthalmologist, Lusby Vision Institute, La Jolla, California. Also reviewed by A.D.A.M. Health Solutions, Ebix, Inc., Editorial Team: David Zieve, MD, MHA, Bethanne Black, Stephanie Slon, and Nissi Wang.

            The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
            adam.com

            A.D.A.M. content is best viewed in IE9 or above, Fire Fox and chrome browser.


            Back  |  Top
            About Us
            Contact Us
            History
            Mission
            Locations & Directions
            Quality Reports
            Annual Reports
            Honors & Awards
            Community Health Needs
            Assessment

            Newsroom
            Services
            Brain & Spine
            Cancer
            Heart
            Maternity
            Orthopedics
            Pulmonary
            Sleep Medicine
            Urgent Care
            Women's Services
            All Services
            Patients & Visitors
            Locations & Directions
            Find a Physician
            Tour St. Luke's
            Patient & Visitor Information
            Contact Us
            Payment Options
            Financial Assistance
            Send a Card
            Mammogram Appointments
            Health Tools
            My Personal Health
            mystlukes
            Spirit of Women
            Health Information & Tools
            Clinical Trials
            Health Risk Assessments
            Employer Programs -
            Passport to Wellness

            Classes & Events
            Classes & Events
            Spirit of Women
            Donate & Volunteer
            Giving Opportunities
            Volunteer
            Physicians & Employees
            For Physicians
            Remote Access
            Medical Residency Information
            Pharmacy Residency Information
            Physician CPOE Training
            Careers
            Careers
            St. Luke's Hospital - 232 South Woods Mill Road - Chesterfield, MO 63017 Main Number: 314-434-1500 Emergency Dept: 314-205-6990 Patient Billing: 888-924-9200
            Copyright © St. Luke's Hospital Website Terms and Conditions  |  Privacy Policy  |  Patient Notice of Privacy Policies PDF Sitemap St. Luke's Mobile