Locations Main Campus: Chesterfield, MO 63017   |   Locations
314-434-1500 314-434-1500   |   Contact Us

Multimedia Encyclopedia


 
E-mail Form
Email Results

 
 
Print-Friendly
Bookmarks
bookmarks-menu

Esophageal culture

Culture - esophageal

 

Esophageal culture is a laboratory test that checks for infection-causing germs in a sample of tissue from the esophagus.

How the Test is Performed

 

A sample of tissue from your esophagus is needed. The sample is taken during a procedure called esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD).

The sample is sent to a lab. There, it is placed in a special dish (culture) and watched for the growth of bacteria, fungi, or viruses.

Other tests may be done to determine what medicine can best treat the organism.

 

How to Prepare for the Test

 

Follow your health care provider's instructions on how to prepare for EGD.

 

How the Test will Feel

 

During EGD, you will receive medicine to relax you. You may have some discomfort or feel like gagging as the endoscope is passed through your mouth and throat into the esophagus. This feeling will go away shortly.

 

Why the Test is Performed

 

Your doctor may order this test if you have signs or symptoms of an esophageal infection or disease. You may also have the test if an ongoing infection does not get better with treatment.

 

Normal Results

 

A normal result means that no germs grew in the laboratory dish.

Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Talk to your doctor about the meaning of your specific test results.

 

What Abnormal Results Mean

 

An abnormal result means germs grew in the laboratory dish. This is a sign of an infection of the esophagus, which may be due to bacteria, a virus, or a fungus.

 

Risks

 

Risks are related to the EGD procedure. Your health care provider can explain these risks.

 

 

References

Graman PS. Esophagitis. In: Bennett JE, Dolin R, Blaser MJ, eds. Mandell, Douglas, and Bennett's Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases. 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 99.

Katzka DA. Esophageal disorders caused by medications, trauma, and infection. In: Feldman M, Friedman LS, Brandt LJ, eds. Sleisenger and Fordtran's Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease Pathophysiology/Diagnosis/Management. 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 46.

 
  • Esophageal tissue culture

    Esophageal tissue culture - illustration

    A sample biopsy of esophageal tissue is obtained by placing a tube through the mouth into the esophagus where small instruments grab a portion of esophageal tissue for examination. The test is performed when infection or other diseases of the esophagus are suspected, or an ongoing infection does not respond to treatment.

    Esophageal tissue culture

    illustration

    • Esophageal tissue culture

      Esophageal tissue culture - illustration

      A sample biopsy of esophageal tissue is obtained by placing a tube through the mouth into the esophagus where small instruments grab a portion of esophageal tissue for examination. The test is performed when infection or other diseases of the esophagus are suspected, or an ongoing infection does not respond to treatment.

      Esophageal tissue culture

      illustration

    A Closer Look

     

      Self Care

       

        Tests for Esophageal culture

         

         

        Review Date: 8/20/2015

        Reviewed By: Subodh K. Lal, MD, gastroenterologist at Gastrointestinal Specialists of Georgia, Austell, GA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

        The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
        adam.com

         
         
         

         

         

        A.D.A.M. content is best viewed in IE9 or above, Firefox and Google Chrome browser.



        Content is best viewed in IE9 or above, Firefox and Google Chrome browser.