Locations Main Campus: Chesterfield, MO 63017   |   Locations
314-434-1500 314-434-1500   |   Contact Us

Multimedia Encyclopedia


 
E-mail Form
Email Results

 
 
Print-Friendly
Bookmarks
bookmarks-menu

Esophageal stricture - benign

 

Benign esophageal stricture is a narrowing of the esophagus (the tube from the mouth to the stomach). It causes swallowing difficulties.

Benign means that it is not caused by cancer of the esophagus.

Causes

Esophageal stricture can be caused by:

  • Gastroesophageal reflux (GERD).
  • Eosinophilic esophagitis.
  • Injuries caused by an endoscope.
  • Long-term use of a nasogastric (NG) tube (tube through the nose into the stomach).
  • Swallowing substances that harm the lining of the esophagus. These may include household cleaners, lye, disc batteries, or battery acid.
  • Treatment of esophageal varices.

Symptoms

 

Symptoms may include:

  • Trouble swallowing
  • Pain with swallowing
  • Unintentional weight loss
  • Regurgitation of food

 

Exams and Tests

 

You may need the following tests:

  • Barium swallow to look for narrowing of the esophagus
  • Endoscopy to look for narrowing of the esophagus

 

Treatment

 

Dilation (stretching) of the esophagus is the main treatment for acid reflux related strictures. You may need to have this treatment repeated after a period of time to prevent the stricture from narrowing again.

Proton pump inhibitors (acid-blocking medicines) can keep a peptic stricture from returning. Surgery is rarely needed.

If you have eosinophilic esophagitis, you may need to take medicines or make changes to your diet to reduce the inflammation. In some cases, dilation is done.

 

Outlook (Prognosis)

 

The stricture may come back in the future. This would require a repeat dilation.

 

Possible Complications

 

Swallowing problems may keep you from getting enough fluids and nutrients. Solid food, especially meat, can get stuck above the stricture. If this happens, endoscopy would be needed to remove the lodged food.

There is also a higher risk of having food, fluid, or vomit enter the lungs with regurgitation. This can cause choking or aspiration pneumonia.

 

When to Contact a Medical Professional

 

Call your health care provider if you have swallowing problems that do not go away.

 

Prevention

 

Use safety measures to avoid swallowing substances that can harm your esophagus. Keep dangerous chemicals out of the reach of children. See your provider if you have GERD.

 

 

References

Penman ID, Lees CW. Alimentary tract and pancreatic disease. In: Walker BR, Colledge NR, Ralston SH, Penman ID, eds. Davidson's Principles and Practice of Medicine. 22nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Churchill Livingstone; 2014:chap 22.

Pfau PR, Hancock SM. Foreign bodies, bezoards, and caustic ingestions. In: Feldman M, Friedman LS, Brandt LJ, eds. Sleisenger and Fordtran's Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease. 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 27.

Ricthter JE, Friendenberg FK. Gastroesophageal reflux disease. In: Feldman M, Friedman LS, Brandt LJ, eds. Sleisenger and Fordtran's Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease. 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 44.

 
  • Schatzki ring - x-ray

    Schatzki ring - x-ray - illustration

    A solution containing a dye (barium), which is visible on x-rays, has been swallowed (upper GI series) and x-rays have been taken of the esophagus. There is a narrowing near the stomach (indicated by the arrow). This non-cancerous ring of tissue (Shatzki ring) may cause swallowing problems (dysphagia) and can be treated with dilation of the stricture.

    Schatzki ring - x-ray

    illustration

  • Digestive system organs

    Digestive system organs - illustration

    The digestive system organs in the abdominal cavity include the liver, gallbladder, stomach, small intestine and large intestine.

    Digestive system organs

    illustration

    • Schatzki ring - x-ray

      Schatzki ring - x-ray - illustration

      A solution containing a dye (barium), which is visible on x-rays, has been swallowed (upper GI series) and x-rays have been taken of the esophagus. There is a narrowing near the stomach (indicated by the arrow). This non-cancerous ring of tissue (Shatzki ring) may cause swallowing problems (dysphagia) and can be treated with dilation of the stricture.

      Schatzki ring - x-ray

      illustration

    • Digestive system organs

      Digestive system organs - illustration

      The digestive system organs in the abdominal cavity include the liver, gallbladder, stomach, small intestine and large intestine.

      Digestive system organs

      illustration

    A Closer Look

     

      Talking to your MD

       

        Self Care

         

          Tests for Esophageal stricture - benign

           

           

          Review Date: 8/2/2016

          Reviewed By: Raymond S. Koff, MD, Clinical Professor of Medicine, University of Connecticut School of Medicine, Farmington, CT. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

          The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
          adam.com

           
           
           

           

           

          A.D.A.M. content is best viewed in IE9 or above, Firefox and Google Chrome browser.



          Content is best viewed in IE9 or above, Firefox and Google Chrome browser.