Locations Main Campus: Chesterfield, MO 63017   |   Locations
314-434-1500 314-434-1500   |   Contact Us

Multimedia Encyclopedia


 
E-mail Form
Email Results

 
 
Print-Friendly
Bookmarks
bookmarks-menu

Idiopathic livedo reticularis

Livedo reticularis; Primary livedo reticularis

 

Idiopathic or primary livedo reticularis refers to a netlike pattern of reddish-blue skin discoloration. Usually the legs are affected. The condition is linked to swollen blood vessels. It may get worse when the temperature is cold.

Idiopathic means the cause is unknown.

Treatment

 

The cause of primary or idiopathic livedo reticularis is not known, therefore specific treatment is usually not recommended. If the condition is due to exposure to cold, keeping the legs warm may help relieve the symptoms. Exercise to increase circulation may also help.

 

 

References

Katugampola RP, Finlay AY. Livedo reticularis. In: Lebwohl MG, Heymann WR, Berth-Jones J, Coulson I, eds. Treatment of Skin Disease: Comprehensive Therapeutic Strategies. 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 134.

 
  • Livedo reticularis - close-up

    Livedo reticularis - close-up - illustration

    This is a close-up view of livedo reticularis. Livedo is a descriptive term used to describe the red, non-blanchable (doesn't turn white when pressed) network-pattern (reticulated) in the skin caused by plugging of the blood vessels. This condition has many causes.

    Livedo reticularis - close-up

    illustration

  • Livedo reticularis on the legs

    Livedo reticularis on the legs - illustration

    This is a close-up view of livedo reticularis on a person's legs. Livedo is a descriptive term used to describe the red, non-blanchable (doesn't turn white when pressed) network-pattern (reticulated) in the skin caused by plugging of the blood vessels. This condition has many causes.

    Livedo reticularis on the legs

    illustration

  • Cholesterol emboli Livedo Reticularis - feet

    Cholesterol emboli Livedo Reticularis - feet - illustration

    Cholesterol emboli block small vessels in dependent areas of the body, here on the foot. The resulting superficial tissue may infarct, and lower vessels may dilate to try and compensate. This creates a livedo, or 'lace-like' pattern.

    Cholesterol emboli Livedo Reticularis - feet

    illustration

    • Livedo reticularis - close-up

      Livedo reticularis - close-up - illustration

      This is a close-up view of livedo reticularis. Livedo is a descriptive term used to describe the red, non-blanchable (doesn't turn white when pressed) network-pattern (reticulated) in the skin caused by plugging of the blood vessels. This condition has many causes.

      Livedo reticularis - close-up

      illustration

    • Livedo reticularis on the legs

      Livedo reticularis on the legs - illustration

      This is a close-up view of livedo reticularis on a person's legs. Livedo is a descriptive term used to describe the red, non-blanchable (doesn't turn white when pressed) network-pattern (reticulated) in the skin caused by plugging of the blood vessels. This condition has many causes.

      Livedo reticularis on the legs

      illustration

    • Cholesterol emboli Livedo Reticularis - feet

      Cholesterol emboli Livedo Reticularis - feet - illustration

      Cholesterol emboli block small vessels in dependent areas of the body, here on the foot. The resulting superficial tissue may infarct, and lower vessels may dilate to try and compensate. This creates a livedo, or 'lace-like' pattern.

      Cholesterol emboli Livedo Reticularis - feet

      illustration

    Self Care

     

       

      Review Date: 4/14/2015

      Reviewed By: Kevin Berman, MD, PhD, Atlanta Center for Dermatologic Disease, Atlanta, GA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

      The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
      adam.com

       
       
       

       

       

      A.D.A.M. content is best viewed in IE9 or above, Firefox and Google Chrome browser.



      Content is best viewed in IE9 or above, Firefox and Google Chrome browser.