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Caput succedaneum

Caput

 

Caput succedaneum is swelling of the scalp in a newborn. It is most often brought on by pressure from the uterus or vaginal wall during a head-first (vertex) delivery.

Causes

 

A caput succedaneum is more likely to form during a long or hard delivery. It is more common after the membranes have broken. This is because the fluid in the amniotic sac is no longer providing a cushion for the baby's head. Vacuum extraction done during a difficult birth can also increase the chances of a caput succedaneum.

A caput succedaneum may be detected by prenatal ultrasound, even before labor or delivery begins. It has been found as early as 31 weeks of pregnancy. Very often, this is due to an early rupture of the membranes or too little amniotic fluid. It is less likely that a caput will form if the membranes stay intact.

 

Symptoms

 

Symptoms may include:

  • Soft, puffy swelling on the scalp of a newborn infant
  • Possible bruising or color change on the scalp swelling area
  • Swelling that may extend to both sides of the scalp
  • Swelling that is most often seen on the portion of the head which presented first

 

Exams and Tests

 

The health care provider will look at the swelling to confirm that it is a caput succedaneum. No other testing is needed.

 

Treatment

 

No treatment is needed. The problem most often goes away on its own within a few days.

 

Outlook (Prognosis)

 

Complete recovery can be expected. The scalp will go back to a normal shape.

 

Possible Complications

 

Complications may include a yellow color to the skin (jaundice) if bruising is involved.

 

When to Contact a Medical Professional

 

Most of the time, the problem is noticed right after birth. You do not need to call your provider unless you have other questions.

 

 

References

Mangurten HH, Puppala BI, Prazad PA. Birth injuries. In: Martin RJ, Fanaroff AA, eds. Fanaroff and Martin's Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine. 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 30.

 
  • Caput succedaneum

    Caput succedaneum - illustration

    Caput succedaneum

    illustration

    • Caput succedaneum

      Caput succedaneum - illustration

      Caput succedaneum

      illustration


     

    Review Date: 4/27/2015

    Reviewed By: Kimberly G Lee, MD, MSc, IBCLC, Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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