Locations Main Campus: Chesterfield, MO 63017   |   Locations
314-434-1500 314-434-1500   |   Contact Us

Multimedia Encyclopedia


 
E-mail Form
Email Results

 
 
Print-Friendly
Bookmarks
bookmarks-menu

Lateral traction

 

Lateral traction is a treatment technique in which weight or tension is used to move a body part to the side or away from its original location.

Information

Traction can be used to treat or reduce any joint dislocation or bone fracture by applying tension to the leg or arm with weights and pulleys to realign the bone. For example, it may be used to help keep a dislocated hip within the hip socket while it heals.

Traction as a treatment involves the amount of tension or force used, the length of time the tension is used, and the means used to maintain the tension. Lateral traction can also be used to treat some broken bones.

 

References

Browner BD, Jupiter JP, Krettek C, Anderson PA. Closed fracture management. In: Browner BD, Jupiter JP, Krettek C, Anderson PA, eds. Skeletal Trauma: Basic Science, Management, and Reconstruction. 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 6.

Thompson SR. Tibial skeletal traction. In: Thompson SR, Zlotolow DA, eds. Handbook of Splinting and Casting. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2012:chap 16.

 
  • Lateral orientation

    Lateral orientation - illustration

    A lateral orientation is a position away from the midline of the body. For instance, the arms are lateral to the chest, and the ears are lateral to the head. A medial orientation is a position toward the midline of the body. An example of medial orientation is the eyes, which are medial to the ears on the head.

    Lateral orientation

    illustration

    • Lateral orientation

      Lateral orientation - illustration

      A lateral orientation is a position away from the midline of the body. For instance, the arms are lateral to the chest, and the ears are lateral to the head. A medial orientation is a position toward the midline of the body. An example of medial orientation is the eyes, which are medial to the ears on the head.

      Lateral orientation

      illustration

    Self Care

     

      Tests for Lateral traction

       

         

        Review Date: 5/9/2015

        Reviewed By: C. Benjamin Ma, MD, Assistant Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, San Francisco, CA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

        The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
        adam.com

         
         
         

         

         

        A.D.A.M. content is best viewed in IE9 or above, Firefox and Google Chrome browser.



        Content is best viewed in IE9 or above, Firefox and Google Chrome browser.