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Macroglossia

 

Macroglossia is a disorder in which the tongue is larger than normal.

Information

Macroglossia is usually caused by an increase in the amount of tissue on the tongue, rather than by a growth, such as a tumor.

This condition can be seen in certain inherited or congenital (existing at birth) disorders, including:

  • Acromegaly (buildup of too much growth hormone in the body)
  • Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (growth disorder that causes large body size, large organs, and other symptoms)
  • Congenital hypothyroidism (decreased production of thyroid hormone)
  • Diabetes (high blood sugar caused by body producing too little or no insulin)
  • Down syndrome (extra copy of chromosome 21, which causes problems with physical and intellectual functioning)
  • Lymphangioma or hemangioma (malformations in the lymph system or buildup of blood vessels in the skin or internal organs)
  • Mucopolysaccharidoses (a group of diseases that cause large amounts of sugar to build up in the body's cells and tissues)
  • Primary amyloidosis (a buildup of abnormal proteins in the body's tissues and organs)

 

References

Dorland's Online Medical Dictionary. Available at: dorlands.com/def.jsp?id=100062359. Accessed May 15, 2015.

Stedman's Online Medical Dictionary. Available at: www.stedmansonline.com/content.aspx?id=mlrM0100001416&termtype=t. Accessed May 15, 2015.

 
  • Throat anatomy

    Throat anatomy - illustration

    Structures of the throat include the esophagus, trachea, epiglottis and tonsils.

    Throat anatomy

    illustration

  • Macroglossia

    Macroglossia - illustration

    Macroglossia is a congenital disorder where the tongue is larger than normal. It is enlarged because of an increase in the amount of tissue, not because of a tumor or growth. There is also a perceived macroglossia in Down syndrome possibly because the tongue frequently protrudes.

    Macroglossia

    illustration

  • Macroglossia

    Macroglossia - illustration

    Macroglossia is a congenital disorder where the tongue is larger than normal. It is enlarged because of an increase in the amount of tissue, not because of a tumor or growth.

    Macroglossia

    illustration

    • Throat anatomy

      Throat anatomy - illustration

      Structures of the throat include the esophagus, trachea, epiglottis and tonsils.

      Throat anatomy

      illustration

    • Macroglossia

      Macroglossia - illustration

      Macroglossia is a congenital disorder where the tongue is larger than normal. It is enlarged because of an increase in the amount of tissue, not because of a tumor or growth. There is also a perceived macroglossia in Down syndrome possibly because the tongue frequently protrudes.

      Macroglossia

      illustration

    • Macroglossia

      Macroglossia - illustration

      Macroglossia is a congenital disorder where the tongue is larger than normal. It is enlarged because of an increase in the amount of tissue, not because of a tumor or growth.

      Macroglossia

      illustration


     

    Review Date: 4/21/2015

    Reviewed By: Neil K. Kaneshiro, MD, MHA, clinical assistant professor of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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