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Uroflowmetry

Uroflow

 

Uroflowmetry is a test that measures the volume of urine released from the body, the speed with which it is released, and how long the release takes.

How the Test is Performed

 

You will urinate in a urinal or toilet fitted with a machine that has a measuring device.

You will be asked to begin urinating after the machine has started. When you finish, the machine will make a report for your health care provider.

 

How to Prepare for the Test

 

Your provider may ask you to temporarily stop taking medicines that can affect the test results.

Uroflowmetry is best done when you have a full bladder. DO NOT urinate for 2 hours before the test. Drink extra fluids so you will have plenty of urine for the test.

DO NOT place any toilet tissue in the test machine.

 

How the Test Will Feel

 

The test involves normal urination, so you should not experience any discomfort.

 

Why the Test is Performed

 

This test is useful in evaluating the function of the urinary tract. In most cases, a person having this test will report urination that is too slow.

 

Normal Results

 

Normal values vary depending on age and sex. In men, urine flow declines with age. Women have less change with age.

  • Ages 4 to 7 -- The average flow rate for both males and females is 10 mL/sec.
  • Ages 8 to 13 -- The average flow rate for males is 12 mL/sec. The average flow rate for females is 15 mL/sec.
  • Ages 14 to 45 -- The average flow rate for males is 21 mL/sec. The average flow rate for females is 18 mL/sec.
  • Ages 46 to 65 -- The average flow rate for males is 12 mL/sec. The average flow rate for females is 18 mL/sec.
  • Ages 66 to 80 -- The average flow rate for males is 9 mL/sec. The average flow rate for females is 18 mL/sec.

 

What Abnormal Results Mean

 

Results are compared with your symptoms and physical exam. A result that may need treatment in one person may not need treatment in another person.

Several circular muscles normally regulate urine flow. If any of these muscles becomes weak or stops working, you may have an increase in urine flow or urinary incontinence.

If there is a bladder outlet obstruction or if the bladder muscle is weak, you may have a decrease in urine flow. The amount of urine that remains in your bladder after urinating can be measured with ultrasound.

Your provider should explain and discuss any abnormal results with you.

 

Risks

 

There are no risks with this test.

 

 

References

Nitti VW. Urodynamic and videourodynamic evaluation of the lower urinary tract. In: Wein AJ, ed. Campbell-Walsh Urology. 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2011:chap 66.

Winters JC, Dmochowski RR, Goldman HB, Herndon CDA, Kobashi KC, Kraus SR, et al. Urodynamic Studies in Adults: AUA/SUFU Guideline. J Urol. 2012;188(6):2455-63.

 
  • Urine sample

    Urine sample - illustration

    Urine is the liquid waste product excreted by the kidneys. It is stored in the bladder until it is emptied out through the urethra.

    Urine sample

    illustration

    • Urine sample

      Urine sample - illustration

      Urine is the liquid waste product excreted by the kidneys. It is stored in the bladder until it is emptied out through the urethra.

      Urine sample

      illustration

    Tests for Uroflowmetry

     

     

    Review Date: 1/21/2015

    Reviewed By: Scott Miller, MD, Urologist in private practice in Atlanta, GA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

    The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
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