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Skin lesion aspiration

 

Skin lesion aspiration is the withdrawal of fluid from a skin lesion (sore).

How the Test is Performed

A needle is put into skin sore or skin abscess, which may contain fluid or pus. The fluid may be examined under a microscope. A sample of the fluid may also be sent to a lab. There, it is put in a lab dish (called a culture medium) and watched for growth of bacteria or fungi.

How to Prepare for the Test

 

You do not need to prepare for this test.

 

How the Test Will Feel

 

The health care provider may inject a numbing medicine (anesthetic) into the skin before inserting the needle if the sore is deep.

You may feel a pricking sensation as the needle enters the skin.

In many cases, removing the fluid will lessen pressure within the skin sore and ease pain.

 

Why the Test is Performed

 

This test is used find the cause of a fluid-filled skin lesion. It can be used to diagnose skin infections.

 

What Abnormal Results Mean

 

Abnormal results may be a sign of a infection caused by bacteria, fungi, or viruses.

 

Risks

 

There is a small risk of bleeding, mild pain, or infection.

 

 

References

Ruocco E, Baroni A, Donnarumma G, Ruocco V. Diagnostic procedures in dermatology. Clin Dermatol. 2011;29:548-56. PMID 21855731 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21855731.

 
  • Skin lesion aspiration

    Skin lesion aspiration - illustration

    By inserting a needle within a skin lesion, fluid or pus can be aspirated and sent to the laboratory for examination. The results may indicate a bacterial or fungal skin infection which then determines the course of treatment.

    Skin lesion aspiration

    illustration

    • Skin lesion aspiration

      Skin lesion aspiration - illustration

      By inserting a needle within a skin lesion, fluid or pus can be aspirated and sent to the laboratory for examination. The results may indicate a bacterial or fungal skin infection which then determines the course of treatment.

      Skin lesion aspiration

      illustration

    A Closer Look

     

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          Tests for Skin lesion aspiration

           

           

          Review Date: 12/2/2014

          Reviewed By: Richard J. Moskowitz, MD, dermatologist in private practice, Mineola, NY. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

          The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
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