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Throat swab culture

Throat culture and sensitivity; Culture - throat

 

A throat swab culture is a laboratory test that is done to identify germs that may cause infection in the throat. It is most often used to diagnose strep throat.

How the Test is Performed

 

You will be asked to tilt your head back and open your mouth wide. Your health care provider will rub a sterile cotton swab along the back of your throat near your tonsils. You will need to resist gagging and closing your mouth while the swab touches this area.

Your provider may need to scrape the back of your throat with the swab several times. This helps improve the chances of detecting bacteria.

 

How to Prepare for the Test

 

DO NOT use antiseptic mouthwash before this test.

 

How the Test will Feel

 

Your throat may be sore when this test is done. You may feel like gagging when the back of your throat is touched with the swab, but the test only lasts a few seconds.

 

Why the Test is Performed

 

This test is done when a throat infection is suspected, particularly strep throat. A throat culture can also help your provider determine which antibiotic will work best for you.

 

Normal Results

 

A normal or negative result means no bacteria or other germs that may cause a sore throat were found.

 

What Abnormal Results Mean

 

An abnormal or positive result means bacteria or other germs that can cause a sore throat were seen on the throat swab.

 

Risks

 

This test is safe and easy to tolerate. In very few people, the sensation of gagging may lead to an urge to vomit or cough.

 

 

References

Nussenbaum B, Bradford CR. Pharyngitis in adults. In: Flint PW, Haughey BH, Lund V, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head and Neck Surgery. 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 9.

Shulman ST. Group A streptococcus. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics. 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 183.

Weber R. Pharyngitis. In: Bope ET, Kellerman RD, eds. Conn's Current Therapy 2016. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:section 1.

 
  • Throat anatomy

    Throat anatomy - illustration

    Structures of the throat include the esophagus, trachea, epiglottis and tonsils.

    Throat anatomy

    illustration

  • Throat swabs

    Throat swabs - illustration

    A throat swab can be used to determine if Group A Streptococcus bacteria is the cause of pharyngitis in a patient.

    Throat swabs

    illustration

    • Throat anatomy

      Throat anatomy - illustration

      Structures of the throat include the esophagus, trachea, epiglottis and tonsils.

      Throat anatomy

      illustration

    • Throat swabs

      Throat swabs - illustration

      A throat swab can be used to determine if Group A Streptococcus bacteria is the cause of pharyngitis in a patient.

      Throat swabs

      illustration

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        Tests for Throat swab culture

         

         

        Review Date: 3/13/2016

        Reviewed By: Jatin M. Vyas, MD, PhD, Assistant Professor in Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Assistant in Medicine, Division of Infectious Disease, Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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