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Urinary catheter - infants

Bladder catheter - infants; Foley catheter - infants; Urinary catheter - neonatal

 

Information

A urinary catheter is a small, soft tube placed in the bladder. This article addresses urinary catheters in babies.

WHY IS A URINARY CATHETER USED?

Babies need urinary catheters if they are not making much urine. Babies can have low urine output because they:

  • Have low blood pressure
  • Have an abnormally developed urinary system
  • Take medicines that will not allow them to move their muscles, such as when a child is on a ventilator

When your baby has a catheter, health care providers can measure how much urine is coming out. They can figure out how much fluid your baby needs.

HOW IS A URINARY CATHETER PLACED?

A provider puts the catheter into the urethra and up into the bladder. The urethra is the opening at the tip of the penis in boys and near the vagina in girls. The provider will:

  • Clean the tip of the penis or around the vagina.
  • Gently put the catheter into the bladder.
  • If a Foley catheter is used, there is a very small balloon on the end of the catheter in the bladder. This is filled with a small amount of water to keep the catheter from falling out.
  • The catheter is connected to a bag for the urine to go into.
  • This bag is emptied into a measuring cup to see how much urine your baby is making.

WHAT ARE THE RISKS OF A URINARY CATHETER?

There is a small risk for injury to the urethra or the bladder when the catheter is inserted. Urinary catheters that are left in place for more than a few days increase the risk for a bladder or kidney infection.

 

References

Blum R, Cote C. Pediatric equipment. In: Cote CJ, Lerman J, Anderson BJ, eds. Practice of anesthesia for infants and children. 5th ed. Elsevier Saunders; 2013:chap 51.

Vogt BA, Dell KM. The kidney and urinary tract of the neonate. In: Martin RJ, Fanaroff AA, Walsh MC, eds. Fanaroff and Martin's Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine. 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 101.

 

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            Review Date: 11/3/2015

            Reviewed By: Kimberly G. Lee, MD, MSc, IBCLC, Associate Professor of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

            The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
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