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Managing your chronic back pain

Chronic back pain - managing; Chronic back pain - self-care; Failed back syndrome - managing; Lumbar stenosis -managing; Spinal stenosis - managing; Sciatica - managing; Chronic lumbar pain - managing

 

Managing chronic pain means finding ways to make your back pain tolerable so you can live your life. You may not be able to get rid of your pain completely, but you can change some things that worsen your pain. These things are called stressors. Some of them may be physical, like the chair you sit in at work. Some may be emotional, like a difficult relationship.

Reducing stress can improve your physical and emotional health. It is not always easy to reduce stress, but it's easier if you are able to ask your friends and family for help.

Make a List

 

First, make a list of what makes your back pain better and what makes it worse.

Then try to make changes in your home and work to decrease the causes of your pain. For example, if bending to pick up heavy pots sends shooting pain down your back, rearrange your kitchen so that the pots are hanging from above or are stored at waist height.

If your back pain is worse at work, talk to your boss. It may be that your workstation isn't set up correctly.

  • If you sit at a computer, make sure that your chair has a straight back with an adjustable seat and back, armrests, and a swivel seat.
  • Ask about having an occupational therapist assess your workspace or movements to see if changes such as a new chair or cushioned mat under your feet would help.
  • Try not to stand for long periods. If you must stand at work, rest one foot on a stool, then the other foot. Keep switching the load of your body's weight between your feet during the day.

Long car rides and getting in and out of the car can be hard on your back. Here are some tips:

  • Adjust your car seat to make it easier to enter, sit in, and get out of your car.
  • Bring your seat as far forward as possible to avoid leaning forward when you are driving.
  • If you drive long distances, stop and walk around every hour.
  • DO NOT lift heavy objects right after a long car ride.

These changes around your home could help relieve your back pain:

  • Raise your foot up to the edge of a chair or stool to put your socks and shoes on instead of bending over. Also consider wearing shorter socks. They are quicker and easier to put on.
  • Use a raised toilet seat or install handrail next to the toilet to help take pressure off your back when you sit on and get up from the toilet. Also make sure the toilet paper is easy to reach.
  • DO NOT wear high-heeled shoes. If you must wear them sometimes, consider wearing comfortable shoes with flat soles to and from the event or until you must put on high-heels.
  • Wear shoes with cushioned soles.
  • Rest your feet on a low stool while you're sitting so that your knees are higher than your hips.

 

Rely on Friends and Family

 

It is important to have strong relationships with family and friends you can depend on when your back pain makes it hard to get through the day.

Take time to build strong friendships at work and outside of work by using caring words and being kind. Give sincere compliments to the people around you. Respect those around you and treat them the way you like to be treated.

If a relationship is causing stress, consider working with a counselor to find ways to resolve conflict and strengthen the relationship

 

Establish Life Routines

 

Set up good life habits and routines such as:

  • Exercise a little every day. Walking is a good way to keep your heart healthy and your muscles strong. If walking is too hard for you, work with a physical therapist to develop an exercise plan that you can do and maintain.
  • Eat foods that are low in fats and sugar. Healthy foods make your body feel better, and they decrease your risk of being overweight, which can cause back pain.
  • Reduce demands on your time. Learn how to say yes to things that are important and no to those that are not.
  • Prevent pain from starting. Figure out what causes your back pain, and find other ways to get the job done.
  • Take medicines as needed.
  • Make time for activities that make you feel relaxed and calm.
  • Give yourself extra time to get things done or to get where you need to go.
  • Do things that make you laugh. Laughter can really help reduce stress.

 

 

References

Barr KP, Concannon LG, Harrast MA. Low back pain. In: Cifu DX, ed. Braddom's Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation. 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 33.

Chou R, Deyo R, Friedly J, et al. Noninvasive treatments for low back pain. Comparative Effectiveness Review No. 169. AHRQ Publication No. 16-EHC004-EF. Rockville, MD: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Updated February 29, 2016. www.effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov/ehc/products/553/2192/Back-pain-treatment-executive-160226.pdf. Accessed July 29, 2016.

Golob AL, Wipf JE. Low back pain. Med Clin North Am. 2014;98(3):405-428. PMID: 24758954 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24758954.

 

        A Closer Look

         

        Talking to your MD

         

          Self Care

           

          Tests for Managing your chronic back pain

           

             

            Review Date: 7/13/2016

            Reviewed By: Linda J. Vorvick, MD, Medical Director and Director of Didactic Curriculum, MEDEX Northwest Division of Physician Assistant Studies, Department of Family Medicine, UW Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

            The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
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