Locations Main Campus: Chesterfield, MO 63017   |   Locations
314-434-1500 314-434-1500   |   Contact Us

Mammography Services

When to get a mammogram - and other breast health guidelines

An annual screening mammogram is recommended for women beginning at age 40, according to the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI).

Every major American medical organization with expertise in breast cancer care, including the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), American Cancer Society (ACS), American College of Radiology (ACR), Society of Breast Imaging (SBI) and National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers (NAPBC), agrees that starting annual mammography at age 40 saves the most lives. ACS guidelines show that if a woman wants to reduce her risk of dying from breast cancer as much as possible, she will choose yearly mammography starting at age 40.

  • A mammogram can find breast cancer years before physical symptoms develop.
  • Since regular mammography screening became widespread in the 1990s, the breast cancer death rate has decreased by 35%.
  • Women who undergo regular mammograms are more likely to have breast cancer found early, are less likely to need aggressive treatment, such as surgery to remove the entire breast (mastectomy) and chemotherapy, and are more likely to be cured.

Do something for yourself and the people you love - get your mammogram today.
St. Luke's offers several convenient mammography locations for screening and diagnostic mammograms, including 2D and 3D mammography.

Breast health guidelines (for women of average risk):

Ages 20-39

  • Get a clinical breast exam by your healthcare provider at least every 3 years. (A clinical breast exam is a manual examination performed by a healthcare provider, looking and feeling the breasts and under the arms for anything unusual, including lumps.)
  • Know how your breasts normally look and feel so you can report any changes to your healthcare provider.

Ages 40-54

  • Get a mammogram every year. (If you are high risk or have a family history of breast cancer, your healthcare provider may suggest starting earlier or having additional screening.)
  • Get an annual clinical breast exam by your healthcare provider.
  • Know how your breasts normally look and feel so you can report any changes to your healthcare provider.

55 and older

  • Switch to mammograms every 2 years, or have the choice to continue yearly screening.
  • Get an annual clinical breast exam by your healthcare provider.
  • Know how your breasts normally look and feel so you can report any changes to your healthcare provider.
  • Screening should continue as long as a woman is in good health and is expected to live 10 years or longer.

These guidelines are for women at average risk for breast cancer. Women with a personal history of breast cancer, a family history of breast cancer, a genetic mutation known to increase risk of breast cancer (such as BRCA), and women who had radiation therapy to the chest before the age of 30 are at higher risk for breast cancer, not average risk. (There are separate guidelines for women at higher-than-average risk.)

Learn more about St. Luke's breast risk assessment and High-Risk Breast Clinic services.